Modelling the N&W Y3 class (Page 3 of 3)

The Lifelike "Heritage" Y3 class 2-8-8-2

N&W RR
This model is produced as #2011, and #2019 in the first release (October 1999).
Model produced as #2016 and #2050 in second release (January 2001).


80 of the Y3 class were built for the N&W beginning 1919, and led to the later developments of the Y4, Y5 and Y6 classes through to 1952. These later engines, were an evolutionary development, but basically had the same boiler and running gear. Gradual improvements were made to boiler pressure, valve settings, water heating etc. Modellers interested in the later classes can obtain a model class Y6b from Rivarossi.

The Lifelike model of #2011 differs from #2019 in the large exhaust bridge pipe for the front engine cylinders, the headlight position, and the pilot. The footboard pilot on 2019 represents the locomotive as used in shunting, local coal mine runs, or hump duty. The fabricated pilot on 2011 is made from old boiler tube, and represents the class used in normal road work. The paint scheme and lettering shown in the image of 2011 was first used by the N&W in 1948. I have seen the production model of the #2050. This has the unmodified front engine cylinder pipe work, so I assume the #2016 has the large bridge pipe on the front engine cylinde

Interestingly, the large bridge pipe between the front low pressure cylinders, was part of a modernisation package applied to certain of the Y3 classes sometime between 1940 and the early 1950's (in fact a hand-me-down front engine assembly from Y5 rebuildings). The bridge pipe was designed to improve the flow of the exhaust steam to the smokebox, and was first designed for the Y5, along with larger piston valves. This modification is correct for 2011, and would also be correct for road numbers 2024, 2041, 2049, 2055, 2069, and 2072, for all of which I have photo evidence. According to Thomas Dressler and Edward King, #2019 did not receive the bridge pipe assembly.

Most of the class remained in service till 1958, but in the later years, were not used on mainline haulage. Engine number 2050 has been preserved, at the Illinois Railway Museum, Union, Illinois. Link to IRM website.

Interesting prototype information, elevations and cross sections plans, and photographs of the Y3 class are contained in the December 1999 Mainline Modeler magazine, published by Hundman Publishing Inc. Mr Hundman makes some interesting observations about the different styles of tenders fitted to the Y3.

Good articles on late steam and early diesel operation on the N&W, are contained in October 2000, and March 2001 issues, of Trains magazines.

An image of the Rivarossi model of the Y6b for comparison.

Visit the Notes on modifying the Y6b model to an earlier version of the N&W engines.

 

Other USRA 2-8-8-2 locomotives which are very similar to the N&W Y3 class

CLINCHFIELD CAROLINA AND OHIO

There were 3 classes of USRA 2-8-8-2 on the Clinchfield, but their large boilered class L2 are the only ones that could be modelled by the Lifelike engine. Road numbers in this class were 725 through 734, acquired from Baldwin in 1919.

The major differences required for this model are:
Standard USRA tender instead of the N&W variety.
Flat plain smokebox door.
2 air pumps hung over the smokebox door.
Slightly different pilot and front deck arrangement.
No bridge steam pipe.
Disc leading and trailing wheels instead of spoked.
No feedwater heater.

NORTHERN PACIFIC

4 locomotives of USRA 2-8-8-2 design were purchased by the NP in 1923, from Alco at Richmond. They were classed as Z-4, and assigned to work out of Livingston, Montana as pushers through the Bozeman Pass and tunnel. For this reason the usual NORTHERN PACIFIC lettering was never applied to the tender sides. It would have been too dirty to read! The cab side carried the road number in white.

These engines could be modelled by the Lifelike engine. Road numbers in this class were 4500 through 4503. All were scrapped in 1951.

The major differences required for the NP model are:
Standard USRA tender instead of the N&W variety.
Flat plain smokebox door.
Air pump hung over the left side of the smokebox door.
Slightly different pilot and front deck arrangement.
No bridge steam piping.
Disc leading and trailing wheels instead of spoked.
No feedwater heater.
Walschaert valve gear instead of Baker.

DENVER AND RIO GRANDE WESTERN

10 locomotives of USRA 2-8-8-2 design were purchased by the D&RGW in 1923, from Alco at Richmond. These class L-107 engines were assigned to work over the Soldier Summit grade between Salt Lake City and Helper, Utah. The cab side carried the road number in white, in a series 3500 though 3509.

These engines could be modelled by the Lifelike engine.

The major differences required for this model are:
Standard USRA tender instead of the N&W variety.
Two air pumps hung over the smokebox door.
Slightly different pilot and front deck arrangement.
No bridge steam piping.
Disc leading and trailing wheels instead of spoked.

A very similar class of locomotives, the N&W Y2a was also sold to the Denver and Rio Grande Western, road numbers 3550 through 3564, in 1943 and 1945. The Y2a was not strictly a USRA design, so there may be dimensional differences. Two Y2a, numbers 109 and 110, were also sold to the Bingham and Garfield (a short line of the Utah Copper Co), in 1943. The Lifelike model could stand in for one of these, because it utilizes the standard N&W tender. However the front end of the Y2a had no bridge steam pipe, and two air pumps were hung at the front of the smokebox.

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